An Island Emerging

Looking On

Generations.  That one word embodies a wealth of power.  One generation can change the way the world thinks, operates and advances forward into the future.  One generation can hold the key to a better life for all.  Some generations have been nearly swept away by disease and war – the civil war in America claimed almost an entire generation, leaving us with a void, taking with it any ideas, creations and leaders that it may have offered.  When I think about Ebeye, I think mostly about its children.  Half of the island population is comprised of children.  Precious generational changers.

I remember reading about Ebeye when I first decided to commit to a year of teaching there.  I  remember thinking that so many good things were happening in the way of communications and technology for a small island that was struggling under the weight of many economic, social and political problems.  But of all that I was reading, I wondered…what do the Marshallese people want? While so many technological advances were being made, what weighed on their hearts in importance?

Well, I didn’t take a formal poll or interview anyone, though it was something I had hoped to do.  It just didn’t materialize.  But through the course of two years, I learned a lot about a culture that is straining to break free of the past outdated traditions while holding onto their heritage as a people.  And where you have 17,000 people, you have just as many opinions, perspectives and solutions to the problems.  There are those who would not change, and those who desperately strain for it.  There is an old mindset and a new one – each with their own advantages and failures.  It is an island of people emerging.  And along with the people spring forth the ideas and….ideologies.

There are many on Ebeye who are left without hope.  And there are those who hold tightly to it.  Hope for a better future than the past has offered.  There are those who dream of being a self-sustaining island again, which is novel but by all practical purposes now impossible.  Developing small islands into towns is too expensive and time consuming to warrant the effort, much less maintain the upkeep of such developments.  And economically speaking there is not much in the way of exports to support the society.  You might think fishing, but there are no commercial seafaring vessels that belong to the Marshalls.  They instead lease out their waters to foreign fisheries who cultivate the profits instead.

Many put hope in their upcoming generation to exact a change and begin to turn things for good. I found that there is an energy among the youth that could set many good things into motion for the small island.  I hope to see it. I hope to see some of my own children rise up and be leaders, changing the scope of the future.  But they would have to decide if they want to advance or stay rooted in tradition.  Are they going to look backwards or forwards?  To new ideas or only historical redundancy? It is a delicate line to walk, but the course of time changes many things including turning over generations and their ideologies, allowing for the next generation to step up and be counted.

Practically speaking, the island is very fragile, in many aspects. There is no one answer that will solve all the difficulties they are now facing.  But the people are not as active or engaged politically as we are here – they have a history of King-People mentality which is only natural to them.  The forces that be are quite confusing, even for me to sort out how things should be done: there are kings, queens, governments, land owners (who have much power), national governments and many other rules and regulations.  But I believe this course will change as the children learn and grow into this mile-long world they call Ebeye. I believe in my heart change is coming. I have to believe it…

I believe in God and the plan He has for all the Marshallese and their islands.  I pray the very best for the Marshallese, my families in the islands and my friends. I will see you again by the grace of God.  And I will be watching to see what good things are happening in your part of the world, praying earnestly for you all.

Ebeye Island

I remember when I was trying to decide if I was going to move to Ebeye and start a whole new chapter in my life.  I scoured  the internet for any peek at what life on Ebeye had to offer.  I found some pretty good info but it wasn’t very detailed.  Hence the desire to post what I’ve learned living on Ebeye these past two years for those who find themselves in the same position.  So if you’re thinking about taking an adventure to the islands as a missionary teacher but aren’t sure what to expect, check out the info below.  Feel free to email me with any questions.  I’d be happy to assist you in your journey any way I can.  Other islands will differ greatly in what they offer as many are not as developed as Ebeye.

Internet Connection

The island has a very good communications center called NTA – this is short for National Telecommunications Authority. A fiber optic cable was laid last year and allows Ebeye to tap into high-speed internet connections.  The cost per minute at NTA, I believe, is somewhere around 8 cents. They also offer the option of service at your place of residence. You can pay about $40/month for the slowest connection plus activation fees and essentially receive unlimited access.  The higher speed you want, obviously the more you will pay. Quick note: Kwajalein is not connected to this cable. Perhaps military reasons, but they are still on dial-up as of the date of this post.

Skype

Yes, you can Skype your friends and family from Ebeye. The connection is fast enough and the signal is good enough to show video. I would suggest getting Skype before you leave and have your friends and family get setup. Because communicating via phone is nearly impossible.

Telephone Communication

This also runs through NTA and is extremely expensive. To phone anywhere beyond the island you will pay $1.80/minute. It may be a better option to have your friends at home buy a calling card and call you. Also, if you call after midnight, the rate goes down. You must purchase a calling card from NTA which you will then use to place your call. Calling cards are $10, $20 and $50.

Cell Phones

I’m sorry to break the news but….your cell phone will not work on Ebeye. It’s a bummer I know. But if you must have a calling gadget, you can purchase a cell phone from NTA and buy minutes to use for local calls on the island. Sounds odd that an island 1 mile long would need so many cell phones but really, it does come in handy. I’m not sure the cost but you can plan to pay around $50 for a moderately featured phone.

Restaurant Dining

Indeed Ebeye has three diners that I know of along with dozens of little shops in people’s homes that sell food and goods. But the diners are located in the Triple J department store, Litaki Fast Food, and a new addition, The Little Mermaid, located in the Ebeye hotel, Anrohasa, on lagoonside. I have eaten at all three places and found the meals satisfying. Litaki and The Little Mermaid both offer mainly Asian cuisine. Triple J is a bit more American with fried chicken, cheeseburgers, French fries and chicken nuggets. One tip that I didn’t find out about until only a month ago is that you can take the ferry across to Kwajalein and call their local pizza joint, Donatos to have a pizza delivered to the check-in gate. You cannot actually enter Kwajalein because it is a military base for the U.S. (unless you have a sponsor who will sign you in.)

Recreation

Ebeye is certainly an adventure and most of the time, it’s up to you what you want to see and do. Beach Park is a small beach at the southern tip of Ebeye which is a good place for swimming and barbecuing. There are plenty of places to explore and you can always rent a water taxi (or better yet, befriend someone with a boat of their own) and head out to some of the outer islands. They are absolutely gorgeous! The fishing and surfing is also good here. There is a causeway that has connected Ebeye to Guggegue island. The northern tip of Guggegue (from what I’ve heard) is a good place to surf. Beware! There are sharks…lots of them. Mainly reef sharks…but still!

Scuba Diving and Snorkeling

If you want to scuba dive, you have found the greatest place in the world for it. There is no larger, more pristine atoll than the
Kwajalein atoll. I prefer snorkeling but whichever you fancy, it will be a fabulous time. There is someone here on the island that offers scuba diving lessons. Sorry but I don’t have that information. I’ll post an update if I get it. FYI: for anyone staying on Kwajalein who happened upon this blog, you will find there is an excellent scuba diving club located there. Here’s a link to the Kwajalein Scuba Club which also has great maps of the entire area. If you live on Ebeye, I don’t think you can join, but the maps are helpful for your own exploring adventures.

Grocery and Clothing Stores

There are many small shops scattered all around Ebeye. You may never know it because they don’t advertise like we do in the U.S. But the best grocer in my opinion would be Triple J. They do a good job at keeping food on the shelves and they are cleaner and more organized with a decent variety of selections. They have frozen meat and canned goods. Items for household cleaning and so on. They even do good keeping the fresh vegetables as fresh as possible when you live on an island.  There are different little nick-knack stores and clothing stores you can peruse. I don’t know the names of all of them but one of the more popular would be Sunrise. It seems almost everywhere people have storefronts in their little homes where the kids buy candy and sugar drinks.

Transportation

The main form of transportation on the island are the taxi trucks.  They loop around the island and provide a ride for only $.75.  You can ride as long as you want.  It’s a good way to see the island to, especially if you sit in the bed of the truck – ah, and the salty ocean views are great along oceanside!  The other mode of transit – if you are a male – is bicycles.  Women are not allowed to wear pants or shorts and so we could never figure out how to get away with riding a bike, especially in the sometimes 30 mile/hour winds.  If you find a way, let us know!

Future Updates

I will continue to update this blog as I receive additional information or think of other things that might be beneficial or interesting to know. Hope this helps in your planning and packing for Ebeye. I’ve been here for two years and it has been a grand adventure for sure. You may not always get what you want, but if you stay open to what the experience can offer, I’m sure you will find this a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to live an island life while making a difference in this world.

Covert Ops

Nowadays I have to be careful, because if I am not, my classes morph into girl-talk and chillin’ with the homies.  My sons and daughters are very good at leading me into these delightful occasions, partly because I may be focusing on something else and partly because I find it necessary to let them invade my ‘professional demeanor’ these last few days and bond with them. Oh heck, they can learn about what adverbs modify next year!

It starts off innocently enough. I’m grading papers and two come over to watch. ‘Ms. Ashley whose paper is that?’  They whisper, they pretend to be so interested in what I’m doing.

Then one more comes over.

Then three more.

Suddenly I’m surrounded by all these little faces intently ‘pretending’ to watch me grade papers.  Then they start leaning over my desk, pulling out papers, playing with rulers and talking about me in Marshallese. I know this because I hear ‘Ms. Ashley’ in the middle of their cheerful chirping. Then I am distracted, stop grading, and ask,

‘What are you saying about me in front of me, huh? I know you’re talking about me…’

and one pipes up, ‘Ms. Ashley Faith says you are so beauoootiful’.

Now how can I tell them to sit down and stop talking and stop leaning on my desk because I need to work?

Then one grabs my ear, ‘Youkuluk! Ms. Ashley!’

Apparently, the upper rim of my ear is uniquely smashed over.  It is, but I’ve never really noticed it much. My mother always told me I had cute elf ears.  It’s amazing what good words over a child can do for their self-esteem. (take note)  People can say other things about my looks and I may believe them. But they can’t say anything about my ears…’cause my momma said…….

Now they are pulling my earrings out of my pierced ear…I’m about half way finished grading;  good for me!

“Everyone get back in your seats and finish your homework…this is homework club afterall!”

Three leave my table but it’s really just a ploy to make me think they are doing what I’m asking. I’m appeased for the moment – they give their signals – the three make their way stealthily back up to my desk.

Did another one just blow in on my right?  Am I surrounded?

Now four of my babies are pulling on both my ears, “Lalle, lalle! Ms. Ashley’s ear!” …which is look at Ms. Ashley’s ear…I smile but they haven’t got me yet, another graded paper finished, pencil still moving…

One of my girls, Jelly, so cute and sweet but tough as nails when she needs to be, is sitting directly in front of me on the opposite side of my table. I can’t go anywhere that she isn’t making sure she is in front of me.  I pull my chair up to the wrong place in front of the class and she will switch seats.

“This isn’t your seat Jelly…get in your seat. Over there.”

My seat is in front of you, Ms. Ashley.”

……I melt…..

Wait, what is that….ouwww!  “Hey, that’s my ear!” I cry out while Faith is inadvertently giving me another piercing through my earlobe.

…giggles….

What is that on my foot…I don’t want to know…keep grading! Stay focused, don’t let them get the best of you!

Therizo: “Ms. Ashley, can I pierce the top of my ear?”

“Yes you can.”

Faith: “How about here Ms. Ashley?” Pointing to her lip.

“Sure.”  I say, with a bit of trepidation.

“Jesus doesn’t care if you pierce your ears or you lips. He’ll love you anyway. But there are some decisions that are wiser than others.”

They look at me….I think it sank in.  But then….

“How about here!?”  Therizo pinches her tongue.

“No! No way not your tongue, that’s not good!”

“My nose?”

It took a few minutes until I realized………I had been duped! They had me!!  My pencil wasn’t moving. I had stopped grading and was surrounded by ear-pulling, lobe-piercing strategists!

One of my sons – you remember, the one that blew in on my right? – is inquiring about his grade.  I cup my hands around his cute little cheeks and commend him on such a great spelling grade!!  “You have improved so much and I’m so proud of you Setlinton.”  He gushes…

What is that on my foot??…..Oh yes, my girl who is called to be in front of me at all times has placed her foot on top of my foot and is just resting it there….how sweet a gesture…

“Ms. Ashley, can we play with your ball?”

“Yes, after you finish your homework you can come get it.”

A collective “Yes!” goes up from the military strategists.

“I carry your bag for you….”

“Hey, bring that back, I’m not finished yet!”  Am I grading? Have I lost this war?

Mark the page at the top, write the comment…..no more papers!

“Finished!!”

Titus: “O K let’s go!”  He had been hounding me that I feared the girls in class and that’s why I kept giving them all the A’s.

“Do you mean favored?”  I ask.

“Yes, you fearvored all the girls and gave them A’s!  That’s not good Ms. Ashley.”

“Nooo, they STUDIED!”

Titus: Big smile. “O K.”

Jelly’s foot comes off my foot, little fingers let go of my ears, questions stop coming like machine-gun bullets, the strategists have disbanded, chairs put back into place, (some) papers folded neatly and placed into backpacks, windows shut, lights out, door locked and closed………………………

…..they make it all worth it.


Gem School Awarded $91K Grant from Embassy of Japan

It is official, Ebeye Gem Christian School has been awarded $91,000 from the Embassy of Japan to be used toward the building of three additional classrooms for the school.  On average, construction costs for one classroom runs about $38K due to labor costs, logistics of shipping construction materials to an island, and the cost of materials in general.  Construction will begin the second week of June, just after the school’s end of year graduation activities.

Here’s a short excerpt from The Marshall Islands Journal April 15, 2011 issue, written by Isaac Marty:

Japan recently held three Grassroots Grants ceremonies for Ebeye and Rairok schools, and Aur Atoll Local Government at the Japan  Embassy last month. For Ebeye, an agreement was signed for a $91,767 grassroots grant to build a three-classroom building in Ebeye for one of the private schools known as the Gem Christian School…officials from Ebeye that were at the ceremony were vice principal Noble Ned, Abita Joram, Kiton Loibwij, Tim Ned, Joel Clinton and Abring Jilly.

Gem School is a rapidly growing educational facility with over 170 students running grades K-5.   Next fall we will be adding a sixth grade and the classrooms are greatly needed to increase our capacity to hold this many students.

Currently we are holding four classes in the three classrooms pictured above due to limited space.

The island of Ebeye is so overcrowded that most children do not attend school at all due to lack of space in the school system.  Sometimes, due to lack of teachers and volunteers, there are schools where the students show up in class with no one to teach them.  It’s a dire situation and nations like Japan are doing what they can to assist Ebeye in their pursuit of a better life.  I personally find this admirable, as Japan is going through their own national crisis right now.

According to the article, Japan’s government has funded nine grassroots projects this year (April 2010-March 2011), and the total contribution to Republic of the Marshall Islands educational system at large is $811, 560.

Those of us here at Gem are incredibly thankful to God and to the Embassy of Japan for their monetary support. It is a blessing to us and to the children of Ebeye.

Seascape Excursion

Sunshine.  Clear blue waters. Chicken marinated in soy sauce, brown sugar, green peppers and onions roasting over an open fire. Add to this recipe two truck loads of energetic third graders that love their teachers and life and you’ve got a barbecue oceanside to be rivaled. We had plenty of fun this past week when my third grade class headed out to the southern tip of Ebeye for an end of quarter Beach Party to celebrate their hard work this past school year.

We decided to venture out – we being Laura, Miriam (my sweet little third grader) and me – to the edge of the coral where the ocean waves were breaking.  During high tide we would need a boat, but low tide lent itself perfectly for some exploring.

Along the way, we came across some interesting creatures and scenes.  In the distance the ocean breaks over the coral ‘drop’ wall that runs around the island.

One thing I learned was that construction crews, at one time, planted explosives into the coral bed to blow out chunks of rock to be used to build the causeway which now connects Ebeye with Gueggegue island.  In doing this, the explosives left huge open ‘pools’ in the reef that become swimming pools when high tide moves out.  Beautiful and haunting oceanscapes to say the least.

There were dozens of these pools that we found ourselves weaving around as we made our way out to the breaking waves.

We caught all kinds of little sea creatures with our camera lens. But that was about as close as we ventured to some of the strange life we saw crouched in the little coral pools and hiding under rocks.

Completely friendly, this star fish that Miriam is holding is called a Brittle Star.  It’s always a good time for some educational input.

There were sea cucumbers strewn about everywhere, as far as the eye could see. While on our exploratory excursion across the sea bed, we met a friendly local who spoke some broken English.  He was collecting sea cucumbers to cook and sell and asked us a few questions concerning our homeland and visit to the islands. He was dark and thin, cigarette tucked handily behind his right ear. He handled himself like he knew what he was doing out here amidst the exploded coral pits, slug-strewn reef and foreign-to-me world.  One thing’s for sure, the Marshallese know these teeming oceans like Americans know rush hour traffic: what’s hazardous and the best way to avoid it is paramount.

Here’s a fine example of a lovely, yet hazardous Blue Black sea urchin. Poisonous, it’s menacing look prompted us to stay away – except for a quick dip with my camera. It’s spikes are hard as steel and are used to chip away at the coral to make little ‘nests’ for them to hide and stab things…like fish.  It wasn’t going to get any of us that’s for sure!

As far out as I felt comfortable venturing with a little one in tow, I dipped my camera underwater one last time capturing some interesting footage.

We headed back to shore but not without some lasting memories of a stroll across a fantastical seascape.  God certainly made this world and all its inhabitants with such creativity and wonder.  I stand amazed at his ingenious creations.  So detailed, so painstakingly thought over, down to the last whip of color, perfectly placed spike or carefully contoured edge of a leaf.  Absolutely beautiful.  Absolutely God.

Food Pyramids and Earthquakes

It’s all in a day’s work at Gem School.  My third graders worked so hard on their food pyramid that I had to share it with everyone.  So here it is..

Isn’t it beautiful :)  It brings tears to my eyes.  I love their handwriting.  I’m so proud of my babies.

We’ve also been taking time to talk about all the events that took place in Japan surrounding the earthquake and how the tsunami could travel all the way to Ebeye through the water.  They got a mini education on ocean geography, wave formation and plate tectonics!  We watched a video on YouTube of the earthquake from inside a store in Japan. They had never seen anything like that before because Ebeye never has earthquakes. We pray for Japan almost daily and they are very much into knowing how the people are doing.  If I accidentally forget to pray about Japan, they quickly remind me. I love my kids.

They have worked hard all year-round but especially the third quarter. So we are celebrating by hitting the beach this Saturday with a barbecue and party.  They are all excited about it – and so are we!  I’ll post some pics of the time we spend hanging out and having fun next week.

Pastor Hone and Mrs. Gracie have returned from ministering in the states.  It’s good to have them back.  And they always bring back goodies to share.  I especially love the chocolate covered macadamia nuts from Hawaii.  What a blessing!

It’s really starting to warm up here…it’s been HOT.  Not much wind and the rain, which had been steadily blowing in once a day, has been avoiding us for three days now.  This year has truly been a blessing in regards to the weather; mostly rainy, cool winds, overcast skies and cool evenings. Cool meaning lower eighties, but believe me, that’s comfortable weather here.  I thank the Lord for it.

See you next week!

Cool Stuff Happenin’ at Gem

Here  are some pics from our previous Education Week activities.  Just some random shots of us playing concentration and having a good time with our kids.  I know every second counts for me, as I am likely not to see them again.  Perhaps on Facebook we can superficially keep in touch but really, it just won’t be the same.  I’ve developed such a love for them in my heart that it will really take the grace of God to help me not to… kidnap them all!

Here’s Jon playing the concentration game.  He was really good at it!  Well, until we realized that some of the kids were more than happy to offer their help when they had the matching card!  But it’s all in a days work with the kiddies.

We had a visit from Kwajalein High School students last week who donated several boxes of items, including a volleyball kit for the school.

There were boxes of folders, binders, artist pencils, pens notebooks and plastic sleeves to name a few.  The kids received all with joy and excitement.  It’s so much fun working with these precious little people :)

The third quarter is coming to a close at the end of next week.  One more 43 day stretch with my babies and it’s done.  Gotta work, work, work so we can finish strong!  But we’ll leave plenty of time for playing too :-)

God’s East Wind: Tsunami 2011

The more I began hearing about the details of the tsunami caused by the 8.9 magnitude  earthquake in Japan, the more I have thanked God every day.

I had set my alarm to get up at 2 a.m. to make a phone call to the states.  I got on the internet and was greeted with emails from friends and family urging me to contact them and let them know I was alive.  I was honestly in shock.  Earthquakes? Tsunami? Marshall Islands?  It was all surreal and I remember turning my head for a moment to listen for the rush, or the calm or whatever you listen for when a tsunami is barreling down on you.

I quickly began emailing to diffuse their anxieties about my well-being.  We were all sleeping, except me and my phone call, and we hadn’t heard a word about the danger.

As the days passed, the story began unfolding and my heart rejoiced more and more in our God.  The initial warning went out just a short time after the earthquake that all of Ebeye was to be evacuated.  The school administration did not inform us but were waiting, I suppose, until they absolutely had to; all the while hoping, praying and believing in God.  The police were canvassing the streets and people were preparing to evacuate. How was this going to happen?  There are sixteen thousand people on this island.  Twyla said she turned to Nobel that night, just hours before the tsunami was scheduled to hit and said, “Where are they going to take all of us?”

I doubt there are enough boats, even using those from Kwajalein, to hold all the people here.  And you need a lot more time than a few hours to transport that large of a number of people and children.  And what about family’s homes and possessions? Even if they took us out to sea, which would likely be the safest place, what would we come back to? Where would we sleep?  And all the food would be washed away. I was thinking about all these things as they were telling me how close we came to disaster.  But God was watching…

An hour before impact, the warning was lifted.  We were all still soundly sleeping.  By the time I had awakened, the danger had passed.  Nobel said the scientists had all their data and charts in front of them and they charted that the winds had shifted, which in turn, stopped the energy of the wave.  He said, “…the scientist have all their data and numbers about the East winds changing direction, and all that scientific stuff but…all I know is that God saves His people!”

I know.  I know that East wind.  They can call it whatever they like. Put a number on it and chart it in their little books. But His eyes are on the righteous and not a sparrow falls to the ground without Him knowing about it…much less sixteen thousand of the most precious people I know, the apples of His eyes.  Closer to peril than I would otherwise ever want to be, I know God and I believe in miracles.  Thank God I’m here writing this blog post to you today.  Thank God for that.  Thank God for His infinite mercy and steadfast love which never ceases.  And thank God for the friends and family and all the people who got down on their knees and prayed, because God answered them.

I just Thank God that I belong to Him.

(Edit) Update 3.14.11

I was talking to Annalise who lives on Kwajalein, about the circumstances involving the evacuation of the islands in this area. We were exchanging information and one of the interesting points she mentioned was the geography of this area.  The islands are part of the largest atoll in the world; we live on the rim of a sunken volcano.

So unlike most beaches in the world that have a slow grade rise up to sea level, we have a 100+ foot drop to the ocean floor.  Tsunamis gain their power and height as the ocean bed ‘pushes’ the mass of water up before hitting land.  But here, when the energy of the wave reached us, its power struck the 100 foot wall and dispelled around the atoll and consequently all the islands were relatively untouched.

She said the scientist and forecasters still aren’t sure what happened (funny that she mentioned that).  The tsunami did come onshore, but it was also perfect timing; low tide.  The majority of the shock was absorbed by the drop off and no damaged occurred.  Thank God!

An Interesting Cargo from Likiep

An interesting cargo hit the dock on Gem School’s campus this week.  The front loading hatch opened to reveal a company of outer island dwellers and their wares.  I unfortunately missed the mass exodus but caught the trailing remnants of handmade burlap sacks filled with coconuts, chickens tethered to string awaiting a glorious destiny with BBQ sauce and fire, friends greeting loved ones they haven’t seen for far too long, geese toted in bent cardboard, and loads of personal goods for sleeping and working.

There were rumors of giant sea turtles, pigs and ducks; precious cargo this boat did carry and there was an excitement in the air as kids perused the goods, played among the hubbub and exchanged laughter and smiles.

As quickly as it started, it trailed off, each person into the vast integral layout of Ebeye, melting into sixteen thousand others like a visitor in Manhattan on a spring day in April.  Not a trace that anyone had even been there.  No chickens, no coconuts, no laughter to speak of.

Yet somewhere, the grill is roasting, old friends are laughing, and secrets are carried on the salty ocean breezes. Adventure and life are being shared and perhaps someone will be whispering once again, “Goodnight old friend, see you in the morning”.

February!

Where has January gone?  It snuck by me in a flurry of after-holidays-acclamations, tests, report cards and parent conferences. February is teeming up to be a quite busy month.  We have Kwajalein Memorial Day week next week in which the kids will be racing at Beach Park and conferences will take place on Wednesday.  We have a PTA meeting tomorrow night about all the particulars of the daily routines.  And Jon is helping to make the float for the parade.

At the end of February is Education Week and an island-wide spelling-b for the kids.  Last year they were not able to put the event together and so Education Week entailed one outdoors meeting in the afternoon and it was over.  So we will also be busily planning for activities that week.  I’m sure I am about  to turn my head and it will be March.

The rains are back and consistent. I love it, really, because rain affords us showers and the convenience of faucet water.  Praise God for the rain!  Not to mention it conceals that burning equator sun.

Time for sleep.  We’ve got a big day tomorrow planning for the week and keeping our regular class schedules.  I’ll let you know how everything goes!

The young fellow on the right caught himself an octopus. As he was passing by, I asked for a quick snapshot, totally amazed at what I was seeing.